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Welcome to Lost Oak Winery's Blog. 

 

Mariam Copeland
 
March 4, 2019 | Mariam Copeland

Sweet Emerson Wine

Little Emerson Carol Lockhart was born on February 24, 2017 with a congenital heart defect that will require much medical attention. She will have two major heart surgeries before the age of five.
 
Emerson is the daughter of Aly and Clint Lockhart. Aly is a former employee of Lost Oak and niece of Lost Oak's winemaker Jim Evans. We are overjoyed to have baby Emerson as part of the Lost Oak Family.
Emerson is pictured here at  four months old.  She loves being in motion, always having music playing, and kicking her feet.  She does not like having her temperature taken and has a sensitive tummy.
She has had three surgeries and is 25 days post heart surgery. She is a little warrior!
 
For every bottle of Emerson wine purchased, Lost Oak will donate $5 to the GoFundMe account for Emerson's ever-growing medical expenses. 

Please help give little Emerson the start in life she needs.

Thank you for your generosity.
 
- The Lost Oak Family
 

 

 

 

Time Posted: Mar 4, 2019 at 8:35 AM
Gene Estes
 
March 4, 2019 | Gene Estes

Blanc du Bois is a Winner

 
We are THRILLED to announce the results of the 2017 Lone Star International Wine Competition, including our new 2016 Blanc du Bois from our own Estate Vineyard, which is released in conjunction with July's Wine Club Wines!
 
2016 Blanc du Bois - Gold; Best in Varietal Blanc du Bois
2015 Cabernet Sauvignon - Silver
2016 Orange Muscat - Silver
2015 Gewurztraminer Frizzante - Bronze
2015 Montepulciano -  Bronze
2016 Sauvignon Blanc - Bronze
2015 Tempranillo - Bronze
2016 Viognier - Bronze
 
The 34th Lone Star International Wine Competition hosted 598 wines and 34 wine bottle labels from 96 wineries in Texas, from other states and two countries.  Judging was completed on June 6 with 12 Double Gold Awards, 91 Gold Medals, 269 Silver Medals, 224 Medals, 6 Best in Varietal, and 12 Grand Star Best of Show.  WOW!  The most wines ever awarded at a Lone Star International Wine Competition.
 
~ Gene & Jim
June 2017
 
Time Posted: Mar 4, 2019 at 8:34 AM
Angela Chapman
 
March 4, 2019 | Angela Chapman

What Are We Waiting For?

There is a chill in the air and fall is here. The grape harvest is over, and the fruits of our labor have been fermented and are… well they're not doing very much. Or are they? 
 
Currently, our 2017 harvest has been turned into wine and are enjoying a bit of rest and relaxation in the form of aging. 
 
 
The reds are in oak barrels 
 
 
and the whites are in stainless steel tanks. 
 
 
 
But why can’t we drink them now and what’s the purpose of aging wine? 
 
 
To answer this, we will have to look at the wine making process. After the grapes are pressed, yeast is added, and fermentation happens. Fermentation is a chemical reaction where in the yeast turns the sugar in the grapes into Co2, heat, and alcohol. Simply put, it is no longer grape juice and that chemical reaction has left the newly made wine a bit unstable and unsure of itself. It lacks complexity, body, and character. 
 
Un-aged wines can come off as sharp and one dimensional. It is perfectly drinkable at this stage in its life but if bottled right then it would decline in quality quickly. Aging the wine allows for the flavor and aromas to develop and set into place making for a more enjoyable wine that will last longer. 
 
Waiting around for wine to age isn’t very much fun, but it’s worth it.
 
 
 
- Written by Angela Chapman, WSET III

Edited by fellow wino Mariam Copeland

 

 

 

Time Posted: Mar 4, 2019 at 7:49 AM